Broccoli microgreens instructions

 

Broccoli Sprouting

Since broccoli microgreens are so easy to grow, they're an excellent variety for first-time growers to sow, raise, and harvest.The seeds are easy to handle, germinate and grow quickly, are easy to harvest, and provide a ton of flavor and crunchy texture to food. Within 8-days of planting the seed, you can be eating your homegrown microgreens. Beginning growers will get to see the whole process happen in about a week, and that keeps then interested in growing microgreens. Most microgreens grow well on a sunny windowsill. A east- or west-facing window is best during the spring, summer, and fall. However, if you want to grow microgreens in the winter, I suggest a north-facing window or using grow lights to ensure your sprouting seedlings receive enough light to green up.

One method of growing Microgreens in Soil:

If you want to grow broccoli microgreens instead of sprouts, planting the seeds in soil is one way to do it, though it can get pretty messy. You only need a few pieces of equipment for the job.

  • Organic potting soil or coir-based potting soil
  • A flat without drainage holes. Other containers work well, too, including take-out containers, plant pots, and empty yogurt containers.
  • Grow lights or a sunny windowsill
  1. Start by filling the flat or container with the potting soil to within an inch of the upper rim.
  2. Then, sow the seeds very thickly. Since your broccoli microgreens are harvested when very young, they don’t need a lot of room to grow.
  3. Cover the seeds with a light dusting of potting soil and water them in well.
  4. Place the tray under grow lights or in a sunny windowsill (see lighting section below).
  5. Keep the soil well watered, but remember that there are no drainage holes in the bottom of the tray so it’s very easy to overwater. Don’t overdo it.
  6. Broccoli microgreens and other varieties are ready to harvest as soon as they develop their first set of true leaves.

Don’t reuse the potting soil to grow more microgreens as it will be depleted of nutrients. Empty the tray and refill with fresh potting soil to grow your next round.




One method of growing Microgreens in Jars:

I’ll start by telling you about one of the easiest ways to grow food indoors. Sprouting is a simple process that requires nothing more than good seeds and some everyday equipment. All you need is a clean, quart-sized jar with either a special lid and base you can purchase for the job, or a piece of window screening or cheesecloth with a rubber band. You can also purchase attractive angled countertop sprouting jars. If you want to get a little fancier, invest in a 2- or 3-tiered sprouting cube.

  1. Sanitize the seeds by soaking 2 TBSP of seeds in a cup of water and 2 TBSP of apple cider vinegar. Let them soak for 10 minutes then drain and rinse with clean water.
  2. Put the seeds in the jar and fill with water to cover the seeds. Put the lid, cloth, or screening over the mouth of the jar and let the seeds soak overnight.
  3. In the morning, drain the jar and then put the jar on its side on the counter. Every day, use fresh water to rinse the seeds two times per day and then drain the jar afterwards.
  4. The seeds will germinate just a few days later. You can eat them anytime after sprouting. I like to wait until they start to turn slightly green before using them.
  5. For a continuous sprout harvest, keep several jars going at a time by starting a new jar every few days. Though I’m talking specifically about how to grow broccoli sprouts, you can use this method to sprout amaranth, cabbage, kale, alfalfa, mung beans, lentils, and other seeds, too.

 

These are 2 of many methods for growing microgreens so if these don't work for your area I would definitely look up some more ways to get your sprouts! Microgreens are definitely a trial and error plant and take lots of patience and care but so beneficial to your household. 



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